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Does DNA in the water tell us how many fish are there?

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Researchers have developed a new non-invasive method to count individual fish by measuring the concentration of environmental DNA in the water, which could be applied for quantitative monitoring of aquatic ecosystems.

Towards lasers powerful enough to investigate a new kind of physics

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
In a paper that made the cover of the journal Applied Physics Letters, an international team of researchers has demonstrated an innovative technique for increasing the intensity of lasers. This approach, based on the compression of light pulses, would make it possible to reach a threshold intensity for a new type of physics that has never been explored before: quantum electrodynamics phenomena.

Protective antibodies identified for rare, polio-like disease in children

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection.

More ecosystem engineers create stability, preventing extinctions

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Biological builders like beavers, elephants, and shipworms re-engineer their environments. How this affects their ecological network is the subject of new research, which finds that increasing the number of "ecosystem engineers" stabilizes the entire network against extinctions.

Getting a grasp on India's malaria burden

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
A new approach could illuminate a critical stage in the life cycle of one of the most common malaria parasites. The approach was developed by scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) in Japan and published in the Malaria Journal.

Novel biomarker discovery could lead to early diagnosis for deadly preeclampsia

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Preeclampsia is a dangerous condition that worldwide kills over 70,000 women and 500,000 babies each year. The discovery of two new biomarkers has the potential to predict key underlying causes of the disease and could lead to the early diagnosis and prevention of severe preeclampsia, and associated complications, researchers say.

Morning exercise is the key to a good night's sleep after heart bypass surgery

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Trouble sleeping after heart bypass surgery? Morning walks are the solution, according to research presented today on ACNAP Essentials 4 You, a scientific platform of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

'Fang'tastic: researchers report amphibians with snake-like dental glands

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Utah State University biologist Edmund 'Butch' Brodie, Jr. and colleagues from Brazil's Butantan Institute describe oral glands in a family of terrestrial caecilians, serpent-like amphibians related to frogs and salamanders.

Scientific 'red flag' reveals new clues about our galaxy, Embry-Riddle researcher says

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
By determining how much energy permeates the center of the Milky Way, researchers have moved closer to understanding the power behind our galaxy.

First evidence of snake-like venom glands found in amphibians

Friday July 3rd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Caecilians are limbless amphibians that can be easily mistaken for snakes. Though caecilians are only distantly related to their reptilian cousins, researchers in a study appearing July 3 in the journal iScience describe specialized glands found along the teeth of the ringed caecilian (Siphonops annulatus), which have the same biological origin and possibly similar function to the venom glands of snakes. As such, caecilians may represent the oldest land-dwelling vertebrate animal with oral venom glands.

Center for BrainHealth advances understanding of brain connectivity in cannabis users

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Center for BrainHealth® recently examined underlying brain networks in long-term cannabis users to identify patterns of brain connectivity when the users crave or have a desire to consume cannabis. While regional brain activation and static connectivity in response to cravings have been studied before, fluctuations in brain network connectivity had not yet been examined in cannabis users. The findings from this study will help support the development of better treatment strategies for cannabis dependence.

Popular chemotherapy drug may be less effective in overweight and obese women

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Breast cancer patients who are overweight or obese might benefit less from treatment with docetaxel, a common chemotherapy drug, than lean patients, a new study finds.

Mobile clinics can help address health care needs of Latino farmworkers

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
A University of California, Riverside, study that sought to determine barriers to health care among Spanish-speaking Latino farmworkers in rural communities has devised an innovative health care service delivery model that addresses many challenges these communities face: mobile health clinics that bring health care services to patients in their community spaces.

COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
1. How to Safely Reopen Colleges and Universities During COVID-19: Experiences From Taiwan ; 2. Urgent Issues Facing Immigrant Physicians in the U.S. in the COVID-19 Era

Marijuana use while pregnant boosts risk of children's sleep problems

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
As many as 7% of moms-to-be use marijuana while pregnant, and that number is rising fast as more use it to quell morning sickness. But new research suggests such use could have a lasting impact on the fetal brain, influencing children's sleep for as much as a decade.

Research reflects how AI sees through the looking glass

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Intrigued by how reflection changes images in subtle and not-so-subtle ways, a team of Cornell University researchers used artificial intelligence to investigate what sets originals apart from their reflections. Their algorithms learned to pick up on unexpected clues such as hair parts, gaze direction and, surprisingly, beards - findings with implications for training machine learning models and detecting faked images.

Why are the offspring of older mothers less fit to live long and prosper?

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
In a new study in rotifers (microscopic invertebrates), scientists tested the evolutionary fitness of older-mother offspring in several real and simulated environments, including laboratory culture, under threat of predation in the wild, or with reduced food supply. They confirmed that this effect of older maternal age, called maternal effect senescence, does reduce evolutionary fitness of the offspring in all environments, primarily through reduced fertility during their peak reproductive period. They also suggest an evolutionary mechanism for why this may occur.

Study: Crowdsourced data could help map urban food deserts

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates. In a feasibility study published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health, scholars found that the methods used by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify areas with low access to healthy food are often outdated and narrow in scope.

Sniffing out smell

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Neuroscientists describe for the first time how relationships between different odors are encoded in the brain. The findings suggest a mechanism that may explain why individuals have common but highly personalized experiences with smell, and inform efforts better understand how the brain transforms information about odor chemistry into the perception of smell.

How prison and police discrimination affect black sexual minority men's health

Thursday July 2nd, 2020 04:00:00 AM
Incarceration and police discrimination may contribute to HIV, depression and anxiety among Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers led study.


Last updated July 1, 2020